Places

Welcome, I decided to add a “Places” Tab. We are asked all the time for pictures of the places we have visited. Click on the pictures for full view. Enjoy.

Haarlem Netherlands:

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Corrie Ten Boom Museum:

Born in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Corrie ten Boom grew up in the nearby city of Haarlem as the youngest of four children born to Cornelia Johanna Arnolda (died 1921 of a cerebral hemorrhage) and Casper (1859–1944). She had two sisters, Betsie ten Boom (died 1944 in the Ravensbrück concentration camp) and Nollie (died in 1953); her brother, Willem ten Boom, was born in 1887 and died in 1946 of spinal Tuberculosis.  Corrie’s three maternal aunts also lived with her family: Bep died in the early 1920s of tuberculosis; Jans died in the mid-1920s of diabetes; and Anna, who took care of the children after their mother’s death, died in the early 1930s.

Casper ten Boom worked as a watchmaker, and in 1924 Corrie became the first licensed female watchmaker in the Netherlands. Corrie and Betsie never married, and until their arrest they lived their entire lives in their childhood home in Haarlem. Corrie also ran a church for mentally-disabled people, raised foster children in her home, and was extremely active in other charitable causes.

In May 1940, the Nazis invaded the Netherlands. Among their restrictions was banning a club which Ten Boom had run for young girls. In May 1942 a well-dressed woman came to the Ten Booms’ with a suitcase in hand and told them that she was a Jew, her husband had been arrested several months before, her son had gone into hiding, and Occupation authorities had recently visited her, so she was afraid to go back. She had heard that the Ten Booms had helped their Jewish neighbors, the Weils, and asked if they might help her too. Casper ten Boom readily agreed that she could stay with them. A devoted reader of the Old Testament, he believed that the Jews were the `chosen people`, and he told the woman, “In this household, God’s people are always welcome.” The family then became very active in the Dutch underground hiding refugees; they honored the Jewish Sabbath.

Thus the Ten Booms began “the hiding place”, or “de schuilplaats”, as it was known in Dutch (also known as “de Béjé”, pronounced in Dutch as ‘bayay’, an abbreviation of their street address, the Barteliorisstraat). Corrie and Betsie opened their home to refugees — both Jews and others who were members of the resistance movement — being sought by the Gestapo and its Dutch counterpart. They had plenty of room, although wartime shortages meant that food was scarce. Every non-Jewish Dutch person had received a ration card, the requirement for obtaining weekly food coupons. Through her charitable work, Ten Boom knew many people in Haarlem and remembered a couple who had a disabled daughter. The father was a civil servant who by then was in charge of the local ration-card office. She went to his house one evening, and when he asked how many ration cards she needed, “I opened my mouth to say, ‘Five,'” Ten Boom wrote in The Hiding Place. “But the number that unexpectedly and astonishingly came out instead was: ‘One hundred.'” He gave them to her and she provided cards to every Jew she met.

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Dachau Germany:

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Dachau concentration camp: This was the first of the Nazi concentration camps opened in Germany, intended to hold political prisoners. It is located on the grounds of an abandoned munitions factory southeast of the medieval town of Dachau, about 16 km (10 mi) northwest of Munich in the state of Bavaria, in southern Germany. Opened in 1933 by Heinrich Himmler, its purpose was enlarged to include forced labor, and eventually, the imprisonment of Jews, ordinary German and Austrian criminals, and eventually foreign nationals from countries that Germany occupied or invaded. The Dachau camp system grew to include nearly 100 sub-camps, which were mostly work camps or “Arbeitskommandos,” and were located throughout southern Germany and Austria. The camps were liberated by U.S. forces in the spring of 1945.

Prisoners lived in constant fear of brutal treatment and terror detention including standing cells, floggings, the so-called tree or pole hanging, and standing at attention for extremely long periods. There were 32,000 documented deaths at the camp, and thousands that are undocumented.

On 14 April 1945, Himmler ordered the evacuation of the camp and the extermination of all inmates at Dachau, writing, “No prisoners shall be allowed to fall into the hands of the enemy alive.” Approximately 10,000 of the 30,000 prisoners were sick at the time of liberation.

In the postwar years the Dachau facility served to hold SS soldiers awaiting trial. After 1948, it held ethnic Germans who had been expelled from eastern Europe and were awaiting resettlement, and also was used for a time as a United States military base during the occupation. It was finally closed for use in 1960.

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It reads:

WORK MAKES FREE

 

 

 

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Berchtesgaden Germany, Hitlers Eagles Nest:

The Kehlsteinhaus (known as the Eagle’s Nest in English-speaking countries) is a Third Reich era edifice erected atop the summit of the Kehlstein, a rocky outcrop that rises above the Obersalzberg near the town of Berchtesgaden. It was presented to Adolf Hitler on his 50th birthday as a retreat and place to entertain friends and visiting dignitaries.

 

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